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out of washington. we have boehner coming out with plan b. we are getting harry reid response saying that speaker banners -- boehner approach is very far away. the markets have managed to move back higher. there is a look at the nasdaq. the dow is a winner of about .5%. connell: let's follow up on this breaking news on the speaker of the house john boehner. dagen: richardson is live in washington, d.c. with what the heck. rich: the house will vote as early as this week to extend tax rates for those making less than a million dollars a year. house speaker john boehner says he is still negotiating plan a with president obama. the reason for the backup plan, speaker boehner says, after optimism, the white house is latest offer has soured the mood within republicans. >> it was essentially a $1.3 trillion in new revenues for only $853 billion in net spending reductions that is not balanced in my opinion. rich: there are substantial differences. the speaker is willing to allow a rate hike on those earning less than, excuse me, more than 1 million. speaker boehner wants a $1 trillion in spe
with an exclusive look at their latest cfo survey. how are cfos planning what washington can decide? liz: state across the country must decide today who will be setting of the mandatory health insurance exchange required by the health care act. the decision could have a big impact on your coverage and the prices you will pay and maybe insurance stocks. we will break down the numbers for you straight ahead. [ male announcer ] this is amy. amy likes to invest in the market. she also likes to ride her bike. she knows the potential for making or losing money can pop up anytime. th's why she trades with the leader in mobile trading. so she's always ready to take action, no matter how wily.. or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung fu
that there is going to be a positive conclusion in washington. the downside is not if there is not a vote to settle it. >> thank you, guys. see you later. have a good weekend. that's the first hour of the "closing bell" with the dow down 40 point. here's the second hour now with bartiromo. >>> hi, everybody. good afternoon. welcome to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo. this market closing lower on this day of national tragedy. we'll have the late on the senseless school shooting in connecticut in just a moment for you, but, first, take a look at how we're finishing the day on wall street. declines on the market. once again worries about the fiscal cliff going into year end. the dow jones industrial average down about 33 points on the session at 13,137. volume really stopped in the middle of the day. we saw things slow down quite a bit on the heels of the awful shooting and fatalities in connecticut. the nasdaq and s&p 500 also under pressure today. the mood down here impacted by the awful events in connecticut with us is hank smith of haverford investments and maggie patel and rajai from barclay
's foreign relations and what's next for president morrissey. washington redskins -- ♪ host: is this sunday, december 16, 2012. the flag over the u.s. capitol, over the white house, and in many locations across the country are at half staff today because of friday's school shooting in newtown, conn.. the nation's newspapers are full of details about what happened on friday. we would like to hear from you your opinions on how america can prevent mass shootings. is it the role of government or society to stop them? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. or join the conversation on facebook by looking for c-span and weighing in. you can also e mail us, journal@c-span.org. here is the first page -- front page of "the hartford current" this morning. "day of grieving." the top headline, along with a list of the victims. the employees, all women. the children, all around the age of 67. this is "the sunday bulletin." "residents gather to find comfor
sarah kliff, a health care reporter with "the washington post." as we continue our series, we want to take a look at different aspects of what we can expect as we face the january 1 deadline. we want to talk about the said likely the doc fix. many people say you have to understand the doc fix. guest: it is something we have had since about a decade ago. back in 1997, congress set a formula for how to pay doc fares. it worked for about five years until the cost of health care started growing. what we have seen every year is congress passed a temporary pay patch to make up the difference. every year, we get to the end of the year and there is this impending gap. right now if we do not pass it, medicare salaries will go down by 25%. everyone thinks the doc fix is not a good idea and we should fix it permanently. it is something that we face every year. host: if nothing happens next year, the cost is estimated to be $25 billion. over two years, $41 billion. guest: it is expensive and we always have to find a way to pay for it. we are looking for some other cuts that we can make to tota
to washington. >> we need to make difficult decisions. often we have conversations about how to create enough revenue to solve the problem. i learned early in my 20s if you have a problem with spending there's not enough revenue to make up for it. we have a spending problem, ladies and gentlemen in america. knotted a revenue -- not a revenue problem. >> he expects to be sworn in on january 3rdrd. once scott give >> thank you. a quick programming note both senate tim scott and nikki haley will join greta van susteren on tonight's on the record at 10:00 p.m. eastern. why secretary of state clinton is not testifying about benghazi this week. it says politics makes strange bed fellows. case in point energy exports next. copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers fo
house around 3:15 eastern. our john harwood is in washington with some more details on what we know right now. john? >> reporter: well, bill, the horror of this tragedy is also muted talk of anything else in washington for the day, including the fiscal cliff and all the issues that we've been discussing for some time now, but one of the jobs of a president is to console victims and to console the nation at a time of grief of this magnitude, so we're going to hear from the president at 3:15. jay carney earlier saying he wasn't going to discuss issues like gun control. it wasn't a day for politics. it's a day to focus on the victims of the tragedy, so you can expect the president is going to focus his remarks on the victims and what happened in connecticut and the attempt to figure out how it happened, why it happened. we'll hear from him at 3:15, and we're going to bring that to you, and we'll talk about it afterwards. >> all right, john, thank you very much. of course, we often talk about how the markets are a mood reflector, and if that's the case, we very much see a market that is
. >> and in washington, the nra breaks it's silence. the kudlow report starts now. >> all right let's go to john harwitt first in dc. i think i agree with what you were saying first. >>> he moved to plan b and the hope that further negotiations could produce progress. >> our plan b would protect american taxpayers who make $1 million or less and have their current rates extended. i continue to have hope. that would reduce spending as well as revenues on the table. >> but of course the democrats in the senate. didn't see plan b as a step forward. harry reid came out and said, john boehner is walking away from the nenegotiations. >> every time we get down to something from the long-term financial think for this country. they do the charlie brown thing, they jerk the ball away. and this is what is going on. >> the posturing conceals the process that we are not aware of. but i talked to a budget aid that said, he thinks things are getting worse in terms for prospects of a deal. >> by the way, my contacts have said the same thing. you thank you very, very much. all of this may be defying predictions. it is a
airlines put together. 50% of people that travel this distance. and between washington d.c. and new york city, amtrak carries twice as many passengers as all airlines come bind. today it carries 75% of inner city travel letters between new york and washington. amtrak has done all this with the threat of funding cuts and privatization especially of the profitable northeast corridor hanging over its head. we know that in other parts of the world privatization of high speed passenger rail has tried and failed to solve the problems it was intended to solve. these plans were almost always preceded by funding cuts, system i can safety and reliability problems caused a great deal of upheaval in the transportation and forced countries to renational lies a system. with that being said, we think that amtrak's long-term next general plan for the northeast corridor provides a temp plate for a public private partnership that is worth discussing. if the partnership does not reduce the public interest or the interest of the brotherhood of lock motive engineers and other skilled workers. further they be
limits to the cert discussed in congress. the ruling is narrow and only washington is the work not known. it's unequivocal that congress intended at the time frames put in their in the court overturned on something called the chevron part 1 or part 2 test. the will of the branch was explicit in the court overturned the will of the elected on a very narrow crown and sent it back. >> ms.: come you mention one word we trade to get through, which was on sequencing. the lack thereof perhaps inspires how the cftc has handled matters versus how the ftc has handled matters. do it elaborate on that? >> shortcoming thank you for the question. the cftc more than any global regulator in the world has attempted to meet the 2012 deadline for derivatives reform. but in doing so they've assembled a confluence of rules that although affect it at the same time in the next few weeks. the contrast that to the ftc's approach would be provided to the market a sequencing plan conditioned on certain foundational roles such as what product definition, some payment the sec digerati with the cftc and definitions
could do well over the next few months, even if the two sides in washington can't rise above politics and come up with a reasonable budget that has both spending cuts and tax increases and seems to be the case right now after the president's discouraging press conference, which suggested that no deal's imminent. and the white house is quietly saying talks have regressed. what about our failure to revisit what didn't happen, what didn't go wrong and the impact on the market? well, let's start with today's incredible news about general motors buying $5.5 billion worth of stock from the u.s. government's t.a.r.p. program. and it was at a price $2 above where gm traded yesterday. that's right. we, the people, got a better deal than we could've ever hoped for just the day before. gm most likely would have been liquidated, putting more than 1 million people out of work. if the federal government hadn't bailed it out. nobody likes a bailout. people don't like to use the phrase bailout and the government isn't going to be made whole in this investment. i'm saying that point-blank. that's beca
about it. the only thing being we're relying on our leaders in washington to try to craft some sort of solution. >> did you have quotes around the word leader then? i'm only watching your lips. if you were to type that, would there be quotes around leaders? >> yes. >> thank you. i rest my case. >> i'm willing to take those quotes off. >> if they show that they are truly leaders without quotes. >> i come to work every day, my tallahassee paycheck, still in my wallet. i was a reporter. i made $137 a week. and if i had seen that go down to 127, i would have been angry. that was my subsistence. there are people who play for dinner in this country and their subsistence are on the line and they're going to be furious. but they're not going to get furious until they see their paycheck. >> it's going to impact gdp in the first quarter, and the second quarter. americans are feeling like they're protected from the democrats? because they're in lower income households? but they won't be. their paychecks will be less because the payroll tax cut will be gone. the amt, also gone. that will affect
on the job. peter doocy is live for us from washington with more on this. hi, peter. >> reporter: heather, the state's department's accountability review board singled out these four people for doing their jobs poorly ahead of the benghazi terror attack on 9/11 the state department told us last week they were all either gone or demoted. this is direct quote from spokeswoman victoria knew land. secretary clinton accepted eric boss equal's decision to resign as effective up immediately. the other three individuals have been relieved of their current duties. all four individuals have been placed on administrative leave pending further action. the "new york post" is reporting those folks are still on the state department payroll. eric boswell who they said resigned did not resign and all four will be back to work before too long. >> they just shifted the deck chairs and they want to make the american people believe that the state department has held people accountable for their lack of security and sending help to four brave americans. this is incredibly inept of the state department to think
between washington, d.c. and new york prefer to take the train. it's not because that is always cheaper. because the service is not. it's because of the time savings and convenience. >> mr. boardman, for the northeast corridor, 80% of the population lives within 25 miles of the northeast corridor making the rail very, very accessible. how would you compare that with california? >> depends on the part of california. one of the things i can answer is, congressman, is that the air rail service between san diego and l.a. is entirely real because it just doesn't work the way that that has, as close as the arts which have and the way that it operates. but when you get to something like l.a. to san francisco you really only have the coast starlight. so there's a sufficient amount of data that would really tell you what really happened here. so from that regard, the old drink am anna karenina right now what they called it, i guess it was the coast daylight, was the primary way they moved up until 15 years ago between san francisco and l.a., and it was probably the most profitable of the private
out of washington have been priced into this market. the dow jones industrials dropped nearly 1%. the nasdaq up 1.4%. a look at the dow jones intraday with a majority of the dow components all into the green, names like bank of america leading the way, oil services all doing well, and talking with equity partners and said why does it pop right now if they think the fiscal cliff talks come to fruition. he said people are chasing. some people taking short-term profits, but altman o alternatee are still believers in a santa claus rally and the fact washington will get it right. melissa: nicole, thank you very much. proposals to avert the fiscal cliff coming fast and furious right now. we want to get you up to speed on where every proposal stands. for the first time the president conceding on tax hikes on those over 400,000 instead of 250,000 per year. that would raise in theory $1.3 trillion in revenue. speaker benard plans for tax hikes on those who make over a million dollars along with a trillion in spending cuts. although it looks like we may be getting closer to a deal, speake
that in washington and that those programs are a huge part of the conversation. host: democrats are saying it is off the table. guest: there are other changes they might be ok with. means testing in medicare which results in those who earn more pay more for their medicare premium. that is one proposal that democrats have begun more comfortable with. there are other changes they might be more comfortable with. host: ron has this suggestion from our twitter page. guest: that is a term we heard. when the cut health care, someone will be bearing the cut.t of that kin that is similar to the concept of those care organizations. they also include quality metrics as part of the contract, where they look at people's outcomes. one way to prevent against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the jan
-up here. i understand the enthusiasm or encouraging signs coming out of washington. but are these two sides really that much closer together? they seem, in some ways, to be talking past one another. >> right. what we don't know is what happened in this meeting today. that could be a sign of some progress. obviously the speaker made a new offer. now we will wait and see what the president will match that with. the political dynamics here are that the speaker needs to go back it republican colleagues on capitol hill and tell him look what i got the president to agree to that we didn't think he would agree to. what is that piece of this? it has to be on the spending side somewhere. that's where this deal will get made if it get made. obviously this level of activity, meetings, phone calls, activity over the weekend, indicates that something is happening. we are moving toward the goal line here. goal being a deal. but there's no question, there's no guarantee of course we will get there all the way. >> it is very interesting, eamon, speaker boehner's position was 800 billion in revenue in
. >> the markets watching washington and shuttling back and forth between the white house and the capitol. eamon javers has the latest. >> it looks like at this point the senate is going to have to come back on december 26th to take up among other pieces of legislation the fiscal cliff solution. apparently. so whether or not that's set in stone, we don't know. but it looks like they're floating now the idea of coming back after christmas to finish up a fiscal cliff deal. and the evidence we're getting closer to the deal came today with speaker boehner going for another meeting with president barack obama. he did not answer reporters' questions. we don't know exactly what was said in that meeting, but we know boehner has proposed new tax revenue of up to $1 trillion and agreed to the idea of raising tax rates in order to do that including on those folks making more than a million dollars a year. at the white house jay carney was asked whether the president's going to stick to his $250,000 a year threshold for tax increases. carney kind of wiggled around that question, didn't pin himself down. giv
us back to your house. make sure to tune in washington, good night. merry christmas. >> they were responding to a fire when somebody started shooting at them. >> upon arrival of the first two engine company and some firefighters in their personal vehicles, they underwent gunfire from the location unknown. >> tonight, firefighters gunned down in the street and why police say it looks like this was a trap. mexican police locked up this former marine over the summer on gun charges. now he has made it home just in time for christmas. >> while i was sleeping johnny got up in the morning and walked to the beach and watched the sun come up. >> jamie: tonight, the reunion that's been months in the making. and christmas at the vatican. >> jamie: we will take to you rome, to bethlehem and to afghanistan for a look at how folks are celebrating. ♪ heaven and nature sing. >> jamie: i'm jamie colby in tonight for shepard smith. we begin tonight with the apparent ambush that has literally stunned a small town in upstate new york this christmas eve. volunteer firefighters had just arrived at th
a shooting killed 26 people at a connecticut primary school. a report from washington. >> a fire in the early morning in a comfortable lakeside community. the phone call that brought forth small town firefighters to the blaze, and out of nowhere, a tragedy on christmas eve. >> all four firefighters were shot at the scene. one firefighter was able to flee the scene on his own, and the other three were p&l in the location. >> two firefighters died of their wounds at the fire, and it took an armored personnel carrier to evacuate residents. the town is distraught. >> it is a very difficult situation. >> a heightened awareness to this kind of violence in light of what happened in connecticut, and i just want everyone to remember that it is christmas eve. we have families who are in pain and crisis today. >> all week, they have been burying the dead in newtown, connecticut, and all week, the argument over the kind of guns available in america and the kind of people that can get all of them. it has gone back and forth. while the fire he said raged, the gunman killed himself. he had already spent 17
at georgetown university and columnist for "the washington post." welcome to you all. kim has put together a short video reminder of what happened in 2012. >> a wave of mass shootings renewed age-old theological discussions about evil, suffering and tragedy. especially after the massacre at the connecticut elementary school, many religious leaders repeated calls for stricter gun control measures. some called it a pro-life issue. one of the mass shootings took place in a house of worship. in august, six people were killed when a gunman opened fire at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. once again, religion played an important role in the presidential election. for the first time ever, there were no white protestants on either ticket. although there wasn't a lot of god talk from president obama or mitt romney, grassroots religious groups were active on both sides. evangelical voters were divided during the primary season, but in the end, they rallied around romney, despite some concerns about voting for a mormon candidate. still, their support didn't put him over the top. obama narrowly w
to a compromise? we go back to cnbc's eamon javers who joins us from washington with all the details. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, larry. you're right, they did meet today. it was a surprise meeting not announced as the previous meetings between the two men have been in past weeks. so we know that the meeting lasted about 45 minutes and that treasury secretary tim geithner also attended. what we don't know is whether the two men came to any deal or not or advanced the discussions in any way today. what we do know is that up here on capitol hill, senator harry reid, the democratic leader, suggested to his fellow senators that they might consider coming back on december 26th, the day after christmas, to finish up the fiscal cliff which suggests to you that they might be heading down the path toward a deal, although that is not set in stone. meanwhile, over at the white house, the press secretary, jay carney, was asked about where the president stands on the fiscal cliff. and he did his best to give as invasive an answer as possible and keep the negotiating wiggle room open. take a listen
thinkin a budget.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength of a leader in retirement planning. the heart of 10,000 advisors working with you one-to-one. together for your future. ♪ >>> huge protests taking place at michigan state house. there's a vote from the house that has passed the right to work bill. want to bring in alison kosik for the latest. this is controversial, allison. how are people responding? >> reporter: there's not much response here. what's going on inside the ca
in the whole vietnam war. so let's get to cnbc's washington correspondent john harwood to talk about how washington will handle the gun control issue. i guess that's what we'll talk about this time. we have a lot to talk to you about involving washington. i guess the lead, obviously, we would be talking about boehner, too, at some point, john. do you have comments on the gun control issue? >> well, i think you saw in the president's address last night, a politician who had been deeply impacted by what happened, like the entire country has been impacted. and i think it is changing the calculus, the way he looks at political risk on this issue. democrats, as you know, joe, for some time has shied away from pushing gun control out of the believe that it is a loser for them politically. republicans have done well when democrats tried to push the gun control bill. there is a broad swath of public opinion that favors things like bans on assault weapons and high volume magazine clips for weapons. i think the president is saying -- when he said on friday, even, before the speech last evening, he
. i want to get to washington with some of the latest headlines regarding speaker boehner and what eamon is referring to as plan b. >> what we know is the speaker is in the basement of the capital building here right now, meeting with republican lawmakers to brief them on the status of the fiscal cliff negotiation, and what a gop leadership aide is now telling news news is the speaker is now prepared to offer what he's calling a plan b, or a modified plan b in which we don't do the grand big deal that the president and speaker of the negotiating on, but instead do something much smaller that would eliminate the pending tax increases for all americans, the speaker saying that he would like to have some kind of a deal, a modified scaled-down proposal now that would eliminate those for as many people as he can. the details are very sketchy on what modified plan b actually means in practice. but basically, it's something he can keep in his hip pocket right now in case these negotiations with the president don't bear fruit. and presumably what we're talking about here, carl, is a little
. lori: why do you think washington as a whole seems to rebuff the idea. >> because it is a source of power. being able to amend the code, and change the code. everyone has to come to you for relief. opponents and competitors and things like that. so they're not going to change on their own. you don't change minds on capitol hill. you do it through the heat of public opinion. as the only way you'll get it done. lori: you're not optimistic. describe for me how you see that environment impacting american business. >> it means hair not going to have even the kind of a semi vibrancy we have this year. fourth quarter will be slower. slower next year because we have these enormous deregulations coming down and health care. taking risks for the future. so now like a car on the superhighway going 30 miles-per-hour on we should be going 70, were going to go down to ten or 15. lori: your take on this idea that american business and investors will rehabilitate the struggling economies your describing earlier in the conversation to the detriment of us in the u.s. >> you have seen some of that
been with the ministry before i was a deputy. >> here in washington you are known as mr. anne applebaum. >> i am proud to be married to anne. >> seven years ago. >> he looks so young. >> does he look that young today? >> he looks wonderful. >> what does that mean that he is now a minister of poland? how does that figure into your interested? >> it does not figure in directly. i have a background in knowledge i would not have otherwise. he does not influence me in a direct way. he is not sitting with me in the archives while i am looking of what happened to the hon. film director in 1947 -- while i am looking at what happened to the hungarian film director in 1947. having this connection gives me some empathy and what happened there. >> what are the residuals from world war ii two today in eastern europe? anything? >> one of the things that happened since 1989 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have anything in common with one another, except a common memory of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is fr
to washington, no vacation without legislation. we will be virtually monitoring airports to see which legislators are leaving town now that the vacation is supposed to begin. you know what? if we don't have a deal by this vacation, or a pledge not to go away, then the odds go to -- down to 50-50 that we'll get one before the end of the year. and then we may only get one when people look at their take-home play and have a collective bout of nausea from a recognition that there was a fiscal cliff all along and we were just pushed over it. that's how much your paycheck's going to shrink. here's the bottom line. let's hope for the best that our politicians move in the right direction. something we can see as early as sunday morning when they appear on the major political talk shows like "meet the press." but we'll be preparing for the worst. >> the house of pain! >> that our lawmakers go home for the holidays, meaning we will likely go over the cliff and nothing will be done about it until after taxpayers actually feel the real pain. let's go to r.w. in nevada, please. r.w. >> caller: jim
. there are no awards, there are no commemorative statues, all he has in his offices are pictures of washington and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark o
shot. those are numbers washington politicians should consider. >> it can easily be considered a poor nation. a lot of people have access to mobile funds and there is a well-established process. the rise of e-cash in mogadishu. >> some good news. the message on her phone says she has been given $150. an equivalent of two months' earnings to turn her tiny store into something like a supermarket. >> the money gives the power to buy and sell things. >> it is all part of a scheme to support people who aid agencies have identified as vulnerable and who need help. the money arrives on the phone itself. the problem with cash, there are plenty of temptations to waste the money. research has shown when you give it to women, they invest in businesses or in their children. >> they developed a system they call e-cash. this is the first time it has been used to deliver aid. >> it is safe, quickly, everything. >> security is what makes it ideal here. not only does she received the money electronically, but she can use the phone to pay for everything. she is disabled,
for him to return to washington. >> reporter: definitely. we expect that he will be heading back to washington, d.c. he was supposed to be here through the new year. i will tell you nothing is official on the schedule that he's definitely going back to d.c., but the sense you get from the white house is that it's more an issue of when and not if. if there is a bill that goes through the senate, the president will have to be there in order to perhaps twist some arms and certainly the optics are important. if we go over the fiscal cliff, suzanne, you've covered the white house. you know the president wouldn't be in hawaii while that happens. >> hopefully you can stay in hawaii, and but you knife to come back with him. we'll see. >> reporter: i think i'd be coming back. >> that's a shame. >>> it's a white christmas for some, and in some places it might be a problem. we're going to check the holiday forecast up next. >>> it's going to be a white and wild christmas in some places. this is stevens pass, washington. a stretch of highway he 2 was impassable because of heavy snow and wind
quickly here. john harward in washington here today. thanks a lot. the cheddar, bacon, onion sandwich that boosted sales for mcdonald's in december. >> steve liesman's exclusive interview with richmond fed president jeffrey lacquer. the lone dissenter at every fed policy meeting this year. more "squawk on the street" after this. the . >>> all right. if the sight of this sandwich makes your mouth water, then you are in luck. because the mcrib is back at mcdonald's today. but how much do limited time offers really impact on sales? we're here to break down the mcrib effect. ladies, great to have you with us. rachel, i'll start off with you. what sort of impact could we see potentially in the month of december? i read in the past, in 2010 at least, one of these limited introduction offers that it actually boosted sales by almost 5%. >> i think it depends on what the lto is and what the prior year same-store comparison is. i wouldn't expect to see a positive number of the magnitude that you're discussing. actually, frankly, it will probably be something in the single digit negatives. but a
. host: sarah kliff covers health care for "the washington post." thank you for joining us. we take a look at america by the numbers and what america looks like by the year 2016. jennifer ortman and william frey here to talk about america by the numbers. we are back in a moment. >> president obama in the reaction to the connecticut shootings. later, the impacts of the so- called fiscal cliff on tax filings. >> president obama on the school shooting in connecticut. he said the time is not to take meaningful action. he was notified by homeland security advisor john brennan. he ordered flags lowered to half staff. this is about 5 minutes. >> i spoke with governor malloy and fbi director muller. i offered governor malloy my condolences on behalf of the nation and made it clear he will have every resource he needs to investigate this crime, care for theirctimw and families. we have endured too many of these tragedies. each time i learned the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. that was true today. there is not a parent in america who does not feel the
to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect. here in washington, obviously, we're facing our own serious challenges. and sometimes those challenges seem so overwhelming that the notion of adding in the layer of complexity to think about the conseque
today where washington once sat, he's have that lincoln cud might be equal value of you and me. tom jefferson, who even thinks a black man should be free? that feather-headed fool would tell you that maybe a president might lie in this new baby. in this squawker, born without a rag, to hide himself, good god it makes me gag. this human spawn, born for the world to wipe its feet upon, a few years hence but now he's more helpless than the litter of a sow and oh, well. send the women folks to see nance. poor little devil. born without a chance. who became one of the greatest presidents we ever had. who passed the emancipation proclamation and made everybody free. but he didn't have a chance. then i want to say to my colleagues one more thing. and then i'll stop. and this is when you speak on the floor and i hope my colleagues will get a chance to read this because it's really important. you drop a pebble in the water, just a splash and it is gone. but there's half a hundred ripples circling on and on and on. spreading, spreading from the center, flowing on out to the sea, and there's n
-income families look at washington and don't see enough progress on jobs, frankly, and folks coming together. i think they will. until they see that, they have a sense there is something substantial that's decided that affects their lives, they're going to be very uncertain. i hear this from taxpayers, i also hear a lot about uncertainty from small business owners. and at the same time we have something we can do about it. or i should say the house has something they can do it about it right now. we passed in the senate this summer in july, i guess it was july 24, a tax cut for middle-class families, meaning we would continue the tax rates for those families. that kind of certainty is badly needed right now. so one of the best things that could rap right now is the house could vote and the president would sign into law legislation that would provide certainty for middle-class families. 98% of american families, and some 97% of small businesses. so it's time for the house to act. secondly, i think we have to take steps to make sure that we're creating jobs at a faster pace, as i mentioned before
tonight i yield whatever time she might want to take to our colleague from the great state of washington -- hawaii. ms. hanabusa: thank you very much to the gentleman from california. i'm here to honor a state which is unique and as special as the person i honor. the person i rise to honor is daniel k. inouye. a person who cannot be described by a single adjective. a person whose accomplishments would cause you to pause and say, is this one person? is this one man? a person was awarded the greatest honor anyone who serves in the military can achieve, the congressional medal of honor. but it was an honor about 55 years late. from a country that questioned his loyalty due to the fact that he was an american of japanese ancestry. a person who could not get a hair cut after being severely wounded and giving -- and given his arm in battle because he looked like the enemy. a person who insisted that instead of being bitter he would dedicate his life to doing all he can to right social inequities and description of all kinds -- discrimination of all kinds. to do this he became part of the democ
cliff waiting for him there back in washington. he attended a memorial service in hawaii for the late senator daniel inouye with the first lady. he is knowing that is what is happening back in washington still matters a great deal. and republicans on some of the sunday talk shows, like senator john barrasso of wyoming was on "fox news sunday" charging that the president really does want the nation to go off the cliff because then tax less go up. take a listen. >> when i listen to the president i think the president is eager to go over the cliff for political purposes. i think he sees a political victory at the bottom of the cliff. he gets all this additional tax revenue for new programs. he gets to cut the military which democrats have been calling for, for years. and he gets to blame republicans for it. >> reporter: democrats say that is ridiculous, that the president has been working with republican leaders again and again trying to workout some sort of a deal, both on spending and taxes to avoid the fiscal cliff, and democrat chuck schumer yesterday said the real problem is that re
christmas in washington, do they? >> you have thursday, friday and monday, right? >> you have a lot of aides prepared to come back after christmas to try and make sure they're not too far away from d.c. it does look encouraging. you've had movements on both sides. you've had boehner indicating that he's willing to accept and rising tax rate for the wealthiest. at the same time, you've had the president scaling back the limit to which those tax rates go up the. >> and they're not arguing about idealogical points any more. >> exactly. >> and what about the debt ceiling? do you think this gets thrown to the mix or not? >> well, i think the white house knows very strongly that as far as the markets are concerned, they want to try and get some kind of clarity for the next few months. after the last couple of years, no one really trusts the government or trusts the administration to not have a series of crisis and tiptoeing to the edge. so my bet is they will try to get some sort of deal. >> who has more trouble convincing the people they need to sign off? boehner could get enough with democrats a
in washington. >>> still to congress on the show, russia has joined the wto. it did it just four months ago, but complaints with its lack of compliance with the laws are already stacking up. we'll get a view when we come back. >>> wto regulations are valid according to a top trade lawyer. karen spoke to an expert and asked why the u.s. invariably features as the main protagonist. >> i think there's a number of factors going on here. first of all, i think it's absolutely normal for the united states to be the most tiff wto dispute settlement participate. if you look at the figures, i think they have been the most active every single year since the wto was founded. it's a natural by-product of the huge size of the u.s. economy. they're the most active trading nation so they're going to trigger the most disputes. they sue the most and they are sued the most. that's absolutely normal. i think presidential politics played into this, as well. as you saw in the last stages of the campaign, both candidates, including president obama wanted to look tough on trade issues and filed a number of cases a
day here on continuing hopes that we will get some sort of deal out of washington. also, with that euro stronger, that's certainly boding well, the dollar a bit weaker. we've got bullish numbers out of the american petroleum institute looking ahead to today's inventory numbers coming from the government. drawdown on crude, drawdowns all across the board. that is supported in the energy sector. but do watch today the january contract expires today. there's much more action in the february contracts. we have to watch the curve a little bit. we could see a little bit of volatility. we'll be back at 10:30 with those inventory numbers from the government. back to you guys. >> all right. thanks very much, bertha coombs. we want to talk about sirius satellite radio. the longtime ceo stepping aside. effective immediately. a bit earlier than had been anticipated. this is a company that is more or less controlled by liberty. and will soon be officially controlled by liberty. they are still waiting for the fcc's right of control to essentially go through. 49.8% of the company right
's washington journal. this >> "washington journal" continues. host: lawrence yun is the chief economist and senior vice president for the national association of realtors. how would you assess the housing markets today? guest: thanks for inviting me, peter. housing market has turned for the better in 2012. the home sales overall look to be about 10% better this year versus last. home prices on average are up about 5%. in some parts of the country, it's up better than 20%. you are seeing places like las vegas and miami where it's about a 10% gain. there's local market variation, but overall the housing market is recovering. host: if the u.s. government and american taxpayers go over the so called "fiscal cliff" what do you foresee for? the for? guest: the fiscal cliff is going to shave off about 4% of gdp, so that the national economic growth. currently is growing about 2%. you can do very simple mathematics. and we are back in a recession. we can anticipate 1 million or 2 million net job losses in 2013. it will be difficult for the housing market to continue its momentum without jobs. s
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